Real parties-in-interest

As defined, a real party-in-interest is the party who stands to be benefited or injured by the judgment in the suit, or the party entitled to the avails of the suit.[1] Generally, every action must be prosecuted or defended in the name of the real parties-in-interest.[2] In other words, the action must be brought by the person who, by substantive law, possesses the right sought to be enforced.[3] Alternatively, one who has no right or interest to protect cannot invoke the jurisdiction of the court as party-plaintiff-in-action for it is jurisprudentially ordained that every action must be prosecuted or defended in the name of the real party-in-interest.[4][1] Heirs of Jose G. Santiago v. Santiago, G.R. No. 161238, July 13, 2009, 592 SCRA 409, 415; citing Section 2, Rule 3 of the 1997 Rules of Civil Procedure.

[2] Section 2, Rule 3 of the 1997 Rules of Civil Procedure.

[3] Consumido v. Ros, G.R. No. 166875, July 31, 2007, 528 SCRA 696, 702; citing Vidal v. Escueta, G.R. No. 156228, December 10, 2003.

[4] Consumido v. Ros, G.R. No. 166875, July 31, 2007, 528 SCRA 696, 702; citing Vidal v. Escueta, G.R. No. 156228, December 10, 2003 citing Borlongan v. Madrideo, G.R. No. 120267, January 25, 2000, 323 SCRA 248, 256 (citing 39 Am Jur 858 and the 1997 Rules of Civil Procedure, Rule 3, Section 2).

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